Cameron Turley

Circumpolar Observatory
Affiliate

Affiliate information

Professional Title None provided
Institution None provided
Departmental Affiliation None provided
Related affiliates
Michael W. Twomey July 15, 2018
Robert Boschman July 15, 2018
Frank J. Feeley July 15, 2018
Árni Daníel Júlíusson July 15, 2018
Astrid Ogilvie July 15, 2018
All affiliates

Cameron Turley

Cameron C. Turley is a PhD candidate in Anthropology at The Graduate Center, City University of New York. His dissertation research investigates ethnogenesis and politics in Colonial-Period South Greenland, using foodways as his material analytic. The research combines ethnographic and oral history interviews, archival material, and organic residue and zooarchaeological analysis to reconstruct and interpret changing culinary traditions. Cameron is Principal Investigator of the Alluitsoq Project, a community-based, collaborative archaeological research initiative at the former Lichtenau Moravian mission (established 1774). Since 2016, the project has grown to include numerous collaborations with junior and senior scholars in Greenland and beyond, continues to developed commitments to community engagement and knowledge co-production, is building capacity to respond to cultural heritage threatened by climate change, and is becoming a productive intervention in conversations of Arctic histories and futures in an ecologically and politically precarious time. 

In 2020, The Alluitsoq Project was selected as a top-ranked project for formal affiliation with UNESCO’s new “Building Resilience in Defense of Global Environments and Societies” initiative for integration into their MOST (Management of Social Transformations) intergovernmental science program. The intention of the coalition is to better integrate humanities, social science, and local and traditional knowledge perspectives into research, education and action for global sustainability through development and coordination of resilient responses to environmental and social changes at local and territorial scales.